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You’ve heard that you should be blogging if you’re a photographer. You’ve seen more and more shooters with blogs. Heck, you’ve probably even started one yourself! Do you know why that blog is so critical, and the most important things you need to do to make sure it’s worth the time? Well, let’s figure it out! So, you might already have a blog, or you might be considering one. Before we dive in, a quick shout out to our awesome reader Erin, who suggested this topic. Either way, let’s start off by talking about the reasons why blogging is so important for photographers.

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Photography is a service, and a personal one at that. Your clients are letting you into their lives, and trusting you with some pretty big moments. The more you can give them reason to feel comfortable with hiring you, the better. A blog is a perfect tool for doing just that. It gives you the opportunity to show who you are, why you are a photographer, and what value you can provide to a prospective client. It gives them a look into your motivations and how you treat your clients—info that will be important to their decision. And, of course, it lets them see your latest and greatest work!

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Another benefit is that blogs are a really great way for your clients to share the images you took of them! People love seeing their own photos on their photographer’s blog, and will share the link with all their family and friends. Um….hello awesome word-of-mouth marketing!! Your clients might even ask you if they’ll make the blog, they’re so excited to be featured. Take the time to make great posts for your clients, share why you enjoyed working with them, and they’ll love the experience, and spread the word about you. Win-win!! At the core, a blog is going to let you start establishing your personal brand. You can get your unique voice across thanks to the narrative style of a blog.

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When you are just getting started (as in, during you first 5 – 10 years as a shooter) you are probably going to be improving your work at a very rapid rate. Portfolio sites have a tendency to get stagnant, and many photographers neglect to update them regularly. prospective clients are seeing your newest (and likely best) images. A blog ensures that prospective clients are seeing your newest (and likely best) images. That ensures that they are familiar with your current shooting style, which also has a tendency to evolve! Blogs are also better for SEO than portfolio sites, since they have frequent updates and lots of tasty content.

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Another benefit is that blogs are a really great way for your clients to share the images you took of them! People love seeing their own photos on their photographer’s blog, and will share the link with all their family and friends. Um….hello awesome word-of-mouth marketing!! Your clients might even ask you if they’ll make the blog, they’re so excited to be featured. Take the time to make great posts for your clients, share why you enjoyed working with them, and they’ll love the experience, and spread the word about you. Win-win!! At the core, a blog is going to let you start establishing your personal brand. You can get your unique voice across thanks to the narrative style of a blog.

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Picture what may just be one of the scariest scenarios in your career: The network has slowed to a crawl. You can barely hold a management interface, let alone control the network elements involved. The attack propagates, and as it does you watch your services drop one by one. Panic sets in. You’re experiencing a Denial of Service (DoS) attack. All resources are focused on stamping this fire out—and that may very well be the intention of the attackers. A DoS attack might be a smokescreen to get you to focus elsewhere while the intruder goes about covert business in a much safer fashion, leaving little forensics afterward.

Unordered list

  • TCP, UDP, ICMP, Floods;
  • DNS, NTP, SNMP, SSDP, Specific floods;
  • overlaps, missing, too many;
  • slow READ or loop calls.

Ordered list

  1. TCP, UDP, ICMP, Floods;
  2. DNS, NTP, SNMP, SSDP, Specific floods;
  3. overlaps, missing, too many;
  4. slow READ or loop calls.

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These methods are often overlapped in a targeted fashion. In essence the attack is a series of waves that each hit in varying degrees of sophistication and focus. Other times the attack is relatively primitive and easy to isolate. The reason for this is that in the simplest levels, it’s an easy thing to do.

As an example, a disgruntled student, upset over a new vending matching policy, could mount a DoS attack against his or her school administration. On the other end of the spectrum is a much darker orchestration, the sleight of the hand to get you to look elsewhere. This is typically the signature of an Advanced Persistent Threat….Charles Singleton

Unless an attack is very simple and short-lived, it needs to be distributed in the way it operates. It needs to be generated from various points of origin. This is referred to as a DDoS attack. The attacker needs to coordinate a series of end points to execute some particular event at the same point in time or perhaps, in more sophisticated examples, as phased against a time series.

Some other styles

Bold Text: There is a basic, first situation when it’s not a good idea to do intensity prescriptions.

Italic: There is a basic, first situation when it’s not a good idea to do intensity prescriptions.

Strike-through: There is a basic, first situation when it’s not a good idea to do intensity prescriptions.

Link: There is a basic, first situation when it’s not a good idea to do intensity prescriptions.

Inline Code: There is a basic, first situation when it's not a good idea to do intensity prescriptions.

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Navigating the seas of customer experience management today might be compared to the challenges of the ancient mariners exploring new territories. Customer expectations, always on the move, are transforming with each new innovation in communications.

Like those unknown waters of the once uncharted oceans it is difficult to know the sea lanes of positive customer interactions from the rocky shoals of dissatisfied customers and clients. One of the ways that the tides of customer preference are shifting are how buyers and clients wish to communicate with organizations. The importance of the voice conversation is ebbing. Especially for the up and coming generations of consumers the tide of voice is on the wane.

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The Small Business Administration quotes Nielsen as saying, “Except for the 65-plus age group, teenagers talk the least on their phones.” The trend is just as apparent in the next two more senior demographics. According to the Experian Marketing Services’ 2013 Digital Marketer, “48 percent of adults ages 18 to 24 say that a conversation via text message is just as meaningful as a telephone call.”

This same demographic the report continues, sends or receive 3,853 texts in an average month. As a parent of two in this age group I can attest to these numbers. When I wish to reach my sons, I text them. Experian goes on to point out that text messaging is also becoming increasingly important to other buying groups. One important example are those 25 to 34 who have made a recent dramatic shift to valuing text messaging as a communication medium. Yet, while mapping a course to profit and customer sustainability, relatively few organizations today have discovered text messaging.

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For enterprise organizations around the world, Software Defined Networking (SDN) is transforming the way we build and operate our networking infrastructure. Similar to the way virtualization technology has revolutionized application servers and storage, we are now going through the same evolution on the networking side of the house. The promise of SDN touches on several aspects.

Simplicity and speed of rolling out new services across an organization is one. Flexibility and operational efficiencies to reduce cost is another. However one of the most critical aspects of SDN is its implications on security. With the almost weekly news of hackers penetrating critical institutions around the world, this cannot come soon enough. Let’s look at three ways SDN can help organizations secure their networks and keep hackers at bay. Network Micro-Segmentation. Networks were originally designed to connect devices and users together.

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Using one physical converged network makes sense from a cost and management perspective, but SDN would allow us splitting up this network into secure isolated zones. An attacker, whether an external hacker or even a disgruntled employee, will not be able to have access to any network services outside of their allocated zone. Micro-segmentation allows for even further granularity, separating individual servers, devices, or users into unique secure zones.